27 8 / 2014

22 8 / 2014

isthatshirtfelt:

Hey whatifcatscouldbevampires, welcome back to the states! To celebrate, I drew a super majestic picture of TC in microsoft paint. Enjoy!

Omg, this is glorious. And you’re almost as glorious as Eleanor for making this. (But she’s a cat, so comparing the cat and human scales is tough)

18 8 / 2014

18 8 / 2014

it-used-to-be-fun:

Abbi and Ilana are the idols of a largely underserved and under-chronicled female id.”
"Men have managed to get away with prolonged adolescence, on the screen and in life, in a way that women haven’t. “Women always have to be the eye rollers, as the men make a mess,” Poehler said. “We didn’t want that. Young women can be lost, too.”
— Id Girls - the comedy couple behind “Broad City.” (Nick Paumgarten for the new yorker)

31 7 / 2014

onestarbookreview:

“Gandalf and Bilbo Go Space Trekking”


Well, this book just got moved up on my TBR list

onestarbookreview:

Gandalf and Bilbo Go Space Trekking”

Well, this book just got moved up on my TBR list

31 7 / 2014


#serieswrap #thekilling


The greatest evidence of a Higher Power that I’ve ever experienced is the fact that The Killing’s final season is premiering on Netflix on a national holiday in this godforsaken country

#serieswrap #thekilling

The greatest evidence of a Higher Power that I’ve ever experienced is the fact that The Killing’s final season is premiering on Netflix on a national holiday in this godforsaken country

(Source: kareen-t)

29 7 / 2014

Best creeped out cat pic on the internet, starring my Eleanor

Best creeped out cat pic on the internet, starring my Eleanor

29 7 / 2014

nprbooks:

If you haven’t read Emily Carroll’s shiveringly glorious Through the Woods, our reviewer Amal El-Mohtar recommends you do so immediately:’

In these five graphic tales (meaning comics, not stories told in Grand Guignol fashion — although that linguistic line is definitely blurred here),Carroll’s sinuous prose and emphatic art blend seamlessly into a path through the stories she tells. If there is a key to this collection, it is the phrase “It came from the woods. (Most strange things do),” which recurs in “His Face All Red,” the story of a man who murders his brother only to see him emerge from the woods whole, happy, and unscathed. These are tales of strange things that come from or go into the woods — and what they did to people, or had done to them, along the way.

"His Face All Red" is actually available online — but if you want to see what exactly this lady is running from, you’ll have to get the book:


Through the Woods is complex without being opaque; these are all still clear, deceptively simple stories that are kissing-close to beginning with “once upon a time.” They’re stories about girls who lose a father to the winter, a mother to sickness, a friend to a ghost; they’re stories told as straightforwardly as fairy tale while containing all the rich density of poetry.
I am still not a reader of horror. But I am a reader of poetry, of folk and fairy tales, of dark fantasy, and a frequent wanderer of woods — and as such, I am most certainly a reader of Carroll. 

nprbooks:

If you haven’t read Emily Carroll’s shiveringly glorious Through the Woods, our reviewer Amal El-Mohtar recommends you do so immediately:’

In these five graphic tales (meaning comics, not stories told in Grand Guignol fashion — although that linguistic line is definitely blurred here),Carroll’s sinuous prose and emphatic art blend seamlessly into a path through the stories she tells. If there is a key to this collection, it is the phrase “It came from the woods. (Most strange things do),” which recurs in “His Face All Red,” the story of a man who murders his brother only to see him emerge from the woods whole, happy, and unscathed. These are tales of strange things that come from or go into the woods — and what they did to people, or had done to them, along the way.

"His Face All Red" is actually available online — but if you want to see what exactly this lady is running from, you’ll have to get the book:

Through the Woods is complex without being opaque; these are all still clear, deceptively simple stories that are kissing-close to beginning with “once upon a time.” They’re stories about girls who lose a father to the winter, a mother to sickness, a friend to a ghost; they’re stories told as straightforwardly as fairy tale while containing all the rich density of poetry.

I am still not a reader of horror. But I am a reader of poetry, of folk and fairy tales, of dark fantasy, and a frequent wanderer of woods — and as such, I am most certainly a reader of Carroll. 

29 7 / 2014

dailydot:

I accidentally started a Wikipedia hoax

How did a joke we made up about Amelia Bedelia while we were stoned get repeated all over the Internet for more than five years, by blogs and reporters and elementary school students and even the author of Amelia Bedelia himself?

Five years ago, a couple of high college kids messed with a children’s book page.Last week, they realized they’d never been caught.

dailydot:

I accidentally started a Wikipedia hoax

How did a joke we made up about Amelia Bedelia while we were stoned get repeated all over the Internet for more than five years, by blogs and reporters and elementary school students and even the author of Amelia Bedelia himself?

Five years ago, a couple of high college kids messed with a children’s book page.

Last week, they realized they’d never been caught.

29 7 / 2014

popculturebrain:

Hey, you know that catchy song “Classic" by MKTO? That’s Walt from ‘Lost’ singing it | Warming Glow

It turns out Walt’s ability to write pop radio earworms was why he was special.

baddreamsinthenight